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Diptera.info :: Identification queries :: Diptera (adults)
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Mycetophila?
victorengel
#1 Print Post
Posted on 11-01-2021 07:18
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Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA

Is this M. fisherae?

static.inaturalist.org/photos/109602568/large.jpg

And is this one M. unipunctata?

static.inaturalist.org/photos/104062362/large.jpg

I'm not familiar with the genus. I figured the latter one by the spots on the wings, but maybe that's not diagnostic. The other one is just a guess.
Edited by victorengel on 11-01-2021 19:06
 
Paul Beuk
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Posted on 11-01-2021 12:18
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Where is the material from?
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John Carr
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Posted on 11-01-2021 14:55
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Both Mycetophila fisherae and M. unipunctata lack anterodorsal bristles on the hind tibia.

Laffoon, Jean L. 1957. A revision of the Nearctic species of Fungivora (Diptera, Mycetophilidae). Iowa State College Journal of Science 31(2):141-340.
 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/31715949@N00
victorengel
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Posted on 11-01-2021 19:06
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Sorry. This is from Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA.
 
victorengel
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Posted on 11-01-2021 19:08
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John Carr wrote:
Both Mycetophila fisherae and M. unipunctata lack anterodorsal bristles on the hind tibia.

Laffoon, Jean L. 1957. A revision of the Nearctic species of Fungivora (Diptera, Mycetophilidae). Iowa State College Journal of Science 31(2):141-340.


Thanks. Is this source available online?
 
John Carr
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Posted on 11-01-2021 20:28
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victorengel wrote:
John Carr wrote:
Both Mycetophila fisherae and M. unipunctata lack anterodorsal bristles on the hind tibia.

Laffoon, Jean L. 1957. A revision of the Nearctic species of Fungivora (Diptera, Mycetophilidae). Iowa State College Journal of Science 31(2):141-340.


Thanks. Is this source available online?


https://lib.dr.ia...ol31/iss2/
 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/31715949@N00
victorengel
#7 Print Post
Posted on 12-01-2021 03:52
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John Carr wrote:
victorengel wrote:
John Carr wrote:
Both Mycetophila fisherae and M. unipunctata lack anterodorsal bristles on the hind tibia.

Laffoon, Jean L. 1957. A revision of the Nearctic species of Fungivora (Diptera, Mycetophilidae). Iowa State College Journal of Science 31(2):141-340.


Thanks. Is this source available online?


https://lib.dr.ia...ol31/iss2/


So I should be calling these Fungivora?
 
John Carr
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Posted on 12-01-2021 16:41
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Fungivora is an old name for Myceophila, along with Tendipes for Chironomus and several more. There was a 50 year long dispute among entomologists over whether to use names from an early version of Meigen's classification of Diptera published in 1800 or different names from the final version published in 1803. In the 1960s the authorities decided to use the 1803 names.
 
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victorengel
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Posted on 13-01-2021 22:25
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John Carr wrote:
Both Mycetophila fisherae and M. unipunctata lack anterodorsal bristles on the hind tibia.

Laffoon, Jean L. 1957. A revision of the Nearctic species of Fungivora (Diptera, Mycetophilidae). Iowa State College Journal of Science 31(2):141-340.


I was reading through the paper to understand what the anterodorsal bristles are. It says, "The mid and hind tibiae bear a number of stout bristles arranged in longitudinal rows (Figs. 7, 8). Starting with the dorsal row and moving counterclockwise around the left tibia as seen from the distal aspect, these bristles are referred to as the dorsals, anterodorsals, anteriors, ventrals, and posteriors. The latter are weaker than the others." Counterclockwise around the left tibia to me is easier to interpret as outward dorsally around to inward ventrally. That way it applies to both sides. Unfortunately, the illustration has a leg unconnected to the body, so the question of which ones are the dorsal row is unclear. I think if the legs are held back, the dorsal ones are the dorsal ones, i.e., sticking straight up. The anterior ones would be the ones sticking out. If the legs are held out, the anterior ones would be pointing forward. So the anterodorsal bristles would be between these two rows.

If I'm interpreting this correctly, then I don't see anterodorsal bristles on either of my photos. Rather, I see a row of dorsals and a row of anteriors.

I assume the setulae are just the smaller hairs, and on my photos are nearly in line with the dorsal bristles, just barely closer to the body. Am I identifying these hairs correctly?

By the way, I used an online service to convert the linked document to a searchable one. Is that something that can be uploaded here? It's an 18 MB searchable PDF file.
 
Paul Beuk
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Posted on 14-01-2021 09:23
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victorengel wrote:
By the way, I used an online service to convert the linked document to a searchable one. Is that something that can be uploaded here? It's an 18 MB searchable PDF file.
From what I can see the online document is already serachable. At least, it is when I view it online...
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Paul Beuk
#11 Print Post
Posted on 14-01-2021 09:31
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For orientation, see the glossay, for example anterodorsal or ad. It looks as if neither of you specimens has ad setae. The top one probably would fall into the Mycetophila fungorum group, the bottom one in the Mycetophila ruficollis group. The former was revised by Chandler in 1993 (I think all genitalia jobs). Not sure about the latter, but European species of the ruficollis group are very similar and also require genital dissection for reliable ID.
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victorengel
#12 Print Post
Posted on 14-01-2021 18:31
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Paul Beuk wrote:
For orientation, see the glossay, for example anterodorsal or ad. It looks as if neither of you specimens has ad setae. The top one probably would fall into the Mycetophila fungorum group, the bottom one in the Mycetophila ruficollis group. The former was revised by Chandler in 1993 (I think all genitalia jobs). Not sure about the latter, but European species of the ruficollis group are very similar and also require genital dissection for reliable ID.


You're right. It is searchable. I wonder why I got the idea it wasn't. I only went to the effort of generating a searchable version using OCR because searches weren't working. Oh, well.

Thanks for the additional identification suggestions.


BTW, I don't think an illustration of intersecting cylinders clarifies things because the limbs rotate and move back and forth. Put another way, I know ad bristles are between anterior bristles and dorsal bristles, but which ones are which? John Carr's original comment that fisherae and unipunctata both lack ad bristles on hind tibiae had me originally thinking that was an objection to those identifications based on those bristles being apparent in the photos. So I thought I was looking at ad bristles there, and I was trying to figure how that could be. That's why I posted later that I thought they did not have ad bristles. I guess I jumped to a conclusion reading something from John Carr that was not actually there.
Edited by victorengel on 14-01-2021 18:43
 
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