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Terms Infusion (Glossary) - v3.10
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T
tergite
From tergal meaning 'dorsal'.
In Diptera the upper (dorsal) sclerite of an abdominal segment.

In descriptions and keys tergites are numbered (from the base of the abdomen starting at 1) and often abbreviated. An example:
"TG1 and T8 sparsely brown pruinose. T2-T4 over 1.5 times more long than wide, remaining tergites shorter and wider. T8 visible only on right side. Tergites short setose except TG1, lateral margins of T2 and T3 with long setae." (Neohybos cinereus; Hybotidae).
"Opposite" of sternite a ventral sclerite.
theca
Enlargement of sternite 5/6 in females of many Conopidae, sternite 5 is then produced ventrally as a pad-like structure anteriorly and with a variously developed plate-like portion posteriorly; sternite 6 often similarly developed but with pad-like anterior portion usually smaller and with pate-like posterior portion usually larger than those in segment 5.
Illustration showing a female of Conops flavipes, but in, for example, Sicus the theca is much smaller and rather inconspicuous.
tibia
Second long and well visible segment of the leg, counting from base, situated between the femur (first segment) and the tarsus (distal part of the leg that usually consists of five smaller segments).
Plural: tibiae.

Image courtesy of Japan Drosophila Database
tip
apex (synonym)
tomentose
With tomentum. For example: Dasybasis elquiensis (Tabanidae): 'Tergites I to VI with broad greyish tomentose median posterior spots. Tergites III-VI with pale greyish tomentose sublateral spots.'
tomentum
Pubescence that is composed of matted hair; a covering of short, flattened, recumbent, scale-like hair which merges gradually into dust or pollen. The colour may change with the angle of view.
tomentum
pollinosity (synonym)
triserial
In three rows
tsetse fly
Vernacular name for species in the genus Glossina, the single genus in the family Glossinidae. The name is pronounced /ts/e-/ts/e, teet-SEE, or set-see. Well-known vector of trypanosomiasis.
Links: http://en.wikiped...lossinidae
type genus
The nominal genus that is the name-bearing type of a nominal family-group taxon. (From the Glossary of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature).
type series
The series of specimens on which the original author bases a new nominal species-group taxon. In the absence of a holotype designation, any such specimen is eligible for subsequent designation as the name-bearing type (lectotype); pending lectotype designation, all the specimens of the type series are syntypes and collectively they constitute the name-bearing type. Excluded from the type series are any specimens that the original author expressly excludes or refers to as distinct variants, or doubtfully includes in the taxon. (From the Glossary of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature).
type species
The nominal species that is the name-bearing type of a nominal genus or subgenus. (From the Glossary of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature).
type specimen
Practical: When a biological species is named a single specimen is designated to carry the name. It is a standard of reference and if the species is already described or two species are merged types are maintained in case of dispute. This single specimen is the holotype. Other types are recognized: lectotype is the most significant.
Official: A term used in previous editions of the Code for a holotype, lectotype or neotype, or for any syntype; also used generally for any specimen of the type series. (From the Glossary of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature).
Links: http://en.wikiped...zoology%29

U
uniserial
In one row.
upper calypter
The distal lobe of the posterobasal portion of the axillary membrane that joins the hind margin of the wing to the thorax is called the upper calypter. It begins the membrane folds over then lower calypter. It is usually larger than the lower calypter, but in some groups, e.g. Tabanidae, Acroceridae, and many Calyptratae, the lower calypter is larger than the upper one.

V
vector
In medical entomology, a vector is an arthropod which carries disease producing organisms (bacteria, virus, filarial worms) to a vertebrate host. For example, several species of Culicidae are vectors for malaria.
Links: http://en.wikiped...biology%29.
venter
The side of the fly that we would indicate as 'the belly' in human terms. On practice this means the side where the mouth is positioned an where the legs are placed.
Adjective: ventral.
Opposite: dorsum.
ventral
1. Located on the venter. For legs this means that these are considered as if they were in the position as given in the illustration. So, even if a leg is pointing upwards in a specimen, one should image that the leg was positioned in a horizontal plane, perpendicular to the body axis.

2. Located in a more position towards the venter. For example, a seta can be located ventral to another seta.

Opposite: dorsal.
ventrite
The ventral surface of one of the body segments. An old term
and now considered synonym of sternite.
vertex
Quote from the Manual of Nearctic Diptera:
The median portion of the upper extremity of the head, bounded by the eyes latterally, the occiput posteriorly and the frons anteriorly, ...

Thus it becomes a rather roughly defined area you could call the posterodorsal margin of the head, in the middle of which you will find the (posterior part of) the ocellar triangle.
Page 15 of 16 << < 14 15 16 >
Date and time
13 July 2024 15:45
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11.07.24 13:59
Following up on the update provided by Paul on the donations received in 2024, I just made a donation. Follow my example Wink

07.03.24 01:01
Some flies preserved in ethanol and then pinned often get the eyes sunken, how can this be avoided? Best answer: I usually keep alcohol-collected material in alcohol

17.08.23 16:23
Aneomochtherus

17.08.23 14:54
Tony, I HAD a blank in the file name. Sorry!

17.08.23 14:44
Tony, thanks! I tried it (see "Cylindromyia" Wink but don't see the image in the post.

17.08.23 12:37
pjt - just send the post and attached image. Do not preview thread, as this will lose the link to the image,

16.08.23 09:37
Tried to attach an image to a forum post. jpg, 32kB, 72dpi, no blanks, ... File name is correctly displayed, but when I click "Preview Thread" it just vanishes. Help!

23.02.23 22:29
Has anyone used the Leica DM500, any comments.

27.12.22 22:10
Thanks, Jan Willem! Much appreciated. Grin

19.12.22 12:33
Thanks Paul for your work on keeping this forum available! Just made a donation via PayPal.

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