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Diptera.info :: Identification queries :: Diptera (adults)
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the most crazy fly I've seen so far! Acroceridae - Cyrtus gibbus
jorgemotalmeida
#1 Print Post
Posted on 15-06-2007 20:42
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Location: Viseu - PORTUGAL
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Hi


* locality - Silgueiros - Viseu - PORTUGAL
* date - 2007.06.15
* size - 7 mm (medium fly)
* habitat - openland, near river - near Quercus sp. above dry and burnt (?) Rubus sp.
* substrate - hovering with other acrocerid.


This fly was an amazing thing to see!!! It is breathtaking to see this fly at the first time. In dorsal view... we cannot see the head. Shock It has a proboscis among the legs! All proboscis is yellow but at the extremity is a little dark. Legs are not totally yellow.

Third segment in antenna very short with apical hair , so Cyrtinae. Inside this we have 5 possible genus:
Cyrtus, Opsebius, Paracrocera, Acrocera y Ogcodes -- the last is totally black. The others have small proboscis, but Cyrtus has long proboscis as you can see. So probably Cyrtus. There is Cyrtus gibbus for Portugal, but the legs ARE NOT totally yellow. Neither can be C. pusillus because probosci is not totally black. My spanish friend Gallego helped me with biblio but we don?t have the descriptions for other possible species...

One thing is sure: this fly amazes me totally!! Grin

EDIT ---> Title changed from "the most crazy fly I've seen so far! Acroceridae - Cyrtus sp. which one??" to "the most crazy fly I've seen so far! Acroceridae - Cyrtus gibbus"
jorgemotalmeida attached the following image:


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Edited by jorgemotalmeida on 20-06-2007 10:04
 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/superegnum
jorgemotalmeida
#2 Print Post
Posted on 15-06-2007 20:43
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full body
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jorgemotalmeida
#3 Print Post
Posted on 15-06-2007 20:43
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other view
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jorgemotalmeida
#4 Print Post
Posted on 15-06-2007 20:44
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other...
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jorgemotalmeida
#5 Print Post
Posted on 15-06-2007 20:45
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Grin assisting. Grin and, yes, it is alive!!! Grin impressive. Smile
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Edited by jorgemotalmeida on 15-06-2007 20:49
 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/superegnum
jorgemotalmeida
#6 Print Post
Posted on 15-06-2007 20:46
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it looks like a wasp!! Wink
This fly is spiders' parasitoid. Under flies I spotted Thanatus cf. vulgaris/atratus (Philodromidae) , and some Pardosa sp. and Hogna radiata (both Lycosidae) wandering around.
But it seems that acrocerids.. "apparently have no fixed host-parasitoid relationships at the species level". And attacks spiders that make web? (not sure about this. But lycosids and philodromids don?t build web. )
Edited by jorgemotalmeida on 15-06-2007 21:13
 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/superegnum
Nikita Vikhrev
#7 Print Post
Posted on 15-06-2007 21:33
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Congratulations, Jorge!
Nikita Vikhrev - Zool Museum of Moscow University
 
Jan Zwaaneveld
#8 Print Post
Posted on 15-06-2007 21:48
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Amazing creature, Jorge! I can't wait till I find one myself...
http://slamenietd...web-log.nl
 
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caliprobola
#9 Print Post
Posted on 15-06-2007 21:54
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i guess this is why i look at flies (see http://www.diptera.info/forum/viewthread.php?forum_id=16&thread_id=6851 )
you can find the most amazing living creatures under flies. nice pics!
 
fleabag
#10 Print Post
Posted on 15-06-2007 22:01
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hehe ..what a freakSmile
Edited by fleabag on 15-06-2007 22:02
 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/aphidtwix/
conopid
#11 Print Post
Posted on 15-06-2007 22:03
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What an incredible looking fly. I have always wanted to find an Acrocerid, and now I want to find one even more!Pfft
Nigel Jones, Shrewsbury, United Kingdom
 
Tony Irwin
#12 Print Post
Posted on 15-06-2007 22:19
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I think you win "Fly of the month", Jorge Grin
Tony
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crex
#13 Print Post
Posted on 15-06-2007 22:28
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OMG, what a weird looking creature, but that unusual body form probably fill a purpose. I'm not sure we have Acroceridae here up in the north ... Nice find Jorge!
 
jorgemotalmeida
#14 Print Post
Posted on 16-06-2007 00:57
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I found this fly in this zone: http://tinyurl.com/227zf6 (near that rectangular building, about 20 m to the right - not in the shadow zone neither under the dense trees).

I testify the beginning of mating dance: the flies were flying up and down very quick. The distinctive colours, and the peculiar flight... called me Smile

Thank you all!
 
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jorgemotalmeida
#15 Print Post
Posted on 16-06-2007 10:15
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according to Tony Irwin, in dipterist's handbook, it seems that all acrocerids were reared from lycosids spiders.

The way that larva reaches the spiders is curious. The adults put eggs on the ground and when they mature, the larva can jump Shock and seek for spiders - and enters in joints... and then go to the abdomen. In IV instar stage... they ate all spider... Frown
 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/superegnum
Tony Irwin
#16 Print Post
Posted on 16-06-2007 17:46
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jorgemotalmeida wrote:
according to Tony Irwin, in dipterist's handbook, it seems that all acrocerids were reared from lycosids spiders.


The Dipterists Handbook was written 30 years ago - I'm not sure whether more recent rearing records of (British) acrocerids include other families of spiders. Certainly other families are involved in North America.
The Amateur Entomologists' Society has plans to revise the Dipterists Handbook, and publish a completely new edition. Although aimed primarily at British Dipterists, there will be plenty of useful up-to-date information for everyone when it appears. Smile
Tony
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jorgemotalmeida
#17 Print Post
Posted on 16-06-2007 17:55
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great news! and when will be ready the new edition? Smile
 
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Tony Irwin
#18 Print Post
Posted on 16-06-2007 22:05
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jorgemotalmeida wrote:
great news! and when will be ready the new edition? Smile


I'm not sure. The new edition will be like the last one - there will be quite a number of people involved in writing it, and the process of getting the new (or old! Pfft) authors together has only just started. I guess it will be at least a year before it's available - most of the authors are likely to be busy with other things over the summer.
I'll try to keep everyone posted on progress.
Tony
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Paul Beuk
#19 Print Post
Posted on 20-06-2007 09:52
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I have seen nothing in these pictures that is in contradiction with Cyrtus gibbus as described in Die Fliegen der palaearktischen Region by Sack (1936).
Paul

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jorgemotalmeida
#20 Print Post
Posted on 20-06-2007 10:05
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Paul Beuk wrote:
I have seen nothing in these pictures that is in contradiction with Cyrtus gibbus as described in Die Fliegen der palaearktischen Region by Sack (1936).



Smile And it was spotted here before.
Anyway one of the most interesting flies I've ever seen since Myopa picta. Smile

Is there any information about the size of planidium for these flies?? Any scheme how it seems?
I didn?t know that "They are cosmopolitan in distribution but rarely observed in most places; the majority of the over 500 species are known from fewer than 10 specimens." in wikipedia.org . It lacks there a link for diptera gallery. Grin
Edited by jorgemotalmeida on 20-06-2007 11:43
 
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15.09.19 20:41
Jewelm699 - did you upload it to a forum (which one?) or the gallery? I can't find it.

11.09.19 13:15
I’m hoping someone can identify the phoridae maggot or pupae I just uploaded.

28.08.19 14:29
Rafael p is legs and f1 is fore femur

26.08.19 17:13
If you experienced a very sluggish site recently, it may have been because someone tried to upload a maliciuous script by force. It appears to have failed. The visitor was blocked further access.

25.07.19 15:13
@Paul Beuk Thanks mate!! Best wishes!

22.07.19 15:09
Where are the meaning abbreviations of Lindner's series Die Fliegen der Palaearktischen Region, ie. f1: anterior femur, ...and what about "p"? (I don't possess volume I)

17.07.19 19:37
Yup, you can view the wing from above (dorsal side) and from beneath (ventral side).

16.07.19 13:31
Hey Dipterists! Quick Question: Vein r2+3 bare beneath. I've always assumed that this is below as in when you look at the wing flat. Am I right? Thank youuuuu! Pfft

18.06.19 08:07
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14.06.19 22:21
Thank you Elisabeth Wink

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